Sabbatical

Why is Chicken Parmesan called Chicken Parmesan?

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So, considering that the main cheese that many people use for this is Mozzarella, I have to ask this question just as I asked everyone else. Why is it called Chicken Parmesan instead of Chicken Mozzarella? The closest I got is that there is a little bit of Parmesan in it, and it sounded better. But honestly, I don't think that's the case, and here's why... America loves to be the country that renames stuff just for the fun of it. Don't believe me? What sport is the World Cup played in?... What do you consider Spaghetti?... Where do the words fag and gay really mean (cigarette and happy, by the way)? And not to mention, one of my favorite movies Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory was renamed from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory... let's not talk about that terrible Johnny Depp movie. Because it doesn't exist.

So what does this have to do with America? Well, before I begin let me say that this isn't a jab at the Red, White, and Blue... in fact, I love the stars and stripes. But just like with the aforementioned Spaghetti, when Americans think of Chicken Parmesan what they really mean is Chicken, bathed in marinara sauce, coated with Mozzarella, and then dashed with just a little bit of Parmesan. And when they think spaghetti, they don't think of the noodle itself... they often think of the noodles, with the meat sauce, mixed together, coated with Parmesan cheese, and often served with Garlic Bread... or alone. And again, it's good stuff.

But it's wrong. It's a pet peeve of mine to hear something called one thing, when it's not what it's intended to be. Like, macaroni. It's not just those little elbow noodles, macaroni is any type of noodle where egg is a key ingredient. That's why I use different noodles when I make Macaroni and Cheese....

It's also why, when I make my Chicken Parmesan, I use an Asiago Parmesan instead of Mozzarella. For those of you not familiar, Asiago is a young Parmesan usually about 2 years old. It's not quite as strong as a Romano, but it's still delicious and when you use it with Chicken Parmesan, the flavors change completely in a positive way. It's just something that, to me, is so subtle yet such a big difference in the end that I just can't imagine it in the future.

Now, I hate to get your mouths watering for some delicious Chicken Parmesan only to be left wondering where the recipe and video went to... but then again, the longer you wait the better you'll get to understand what I do in the kitchen and why. So again, sorry to leave you with a teaser, but hey... at least I didn't mention something like Apple Pie.
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  1. Question's Avatar
    ...macaroni is not any pasta made with egg. There's, like, dictionaries online, man. In fact, two seconds on Wiki confirms that macaroni usually doesn't contain eggs.

    Also, Willy Wonka was a way better movie than Charlie.
  2. Rex Splode's Avatar
    Starting from the beginning, the term "soccer" is of British origin not American. It comes from a shorting of "association football." Since they didn't want to call it asser, they took the soc of association. Over time the British stopped using the term they created.

    Now on to your main question, which has a two part answer. First, chicken (or veal, or eggplant) Parmesan should contain Parmesan cheese. However usually not sprinkled on top but rather in the coating/breading that is used on the meat. Second, the dish in Italian is known as Parmigiana, not because of the cheese but because of the Parma region of Italy (where the cheese also originates). Parmigiana is most often translated to Parmesan when used in an English language context.

    Question has already covered the macaroni issue.

    Lastly, Asiago is not a type of Parmesan.
  3. Sabbatical's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Rex Splode
    Starting from the beginning, the term "soccer" is of British origin not American. It comes from a shorting of "association football." Since they didn't want to call it asser, they took the soc of association. Over time the British stopped using the term they created.
    Now on to your main question, which has a two part answer. First, chicken (or veal, or eggplant) Parmesan should contain Parmesan cheese. However usually not sprinkled on top but rather in the coating/breading that is used on the meat. Second, the dish in Italian is known as Parmigiana, not because of the cheese but because of the Parma region of Italy (where the cheese also originates). Parmigiana is most often translated to Parmesan when used in an English language context.

    Question has already covered the macaroni issue.

    Lastly, Asiago is not a type of Parmesan.[/QUOTE]

    Never knew that about Soccer. I was always told America just decided to name it Soccer cause that's how America works. And also, thanks for the clarification on why it's called Chicken Parmesan, it makes sense now.